Nesting Gulls

- 2 mins read

Series: Nesting Gulls

A Glaucous-winged Gull on its nest, panting to keep cool.

A Glaucous-winged Gull on its nest, panting to keep cool.

In Vancouver the start of summer marks the beginning of nesting season for our resident Glaucous-winged Gulls (Larus glaucescens). While many nest in colonies on rocky islands and beaches, some have taken to nesting on rooftops around the city.

I recently revisited four locations where I spotted nests last year while helping out with a census of gull nests in the city.

Here is another contribution of photography to the Why Evolution Is True website of birds photographed in and around Vancouver, BC. You can find the original post here.

Anna’s Hummingbird (Calypte anna)

Place three paper clips in your hand. That is the average weight of an Anna’s Hummingbird (4 grams). This male was keeping watch over his territory at a local park. Check out those little feet! I recommend Jon Dunn’s ‘The Glitter in the Green’ if you’d like to be utterly amazed by these impossible birds.

Anna’s Hummingbird (Calypte anna)

Anna’s Hummingbird (Calypte anna)

Here is another contribution of photography to the Why Evolution Is True website of birds photographed in and around Vancouver, BC. You can find the original post here.

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)

These tiny owls (with the larger females generally no more than 8” in length) are also one of the most common owls in North America. Despite this, there are still many gaps in our knowledge about them as they are secretive, nocturnal, and have irregular movement patterns.

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)

Here is another contribution of photography to the Why Evolution Is True website. You can find the original post here.

I recently read Dave Goulson’s fantastic (and disconcerting) Silent Earth: Averting The Insect Apocalypse and was struck by how I little I know about insects in general, and pollinators specifically. I decided to take matters into my hands and learn something in the way that works best for me — get out and photograph!

So, I dug up my neglected macro lens and headed out into the garden and alleyway behind my building to see what I could find. Surprisingly, even here in the heart of urban Vancouver, BC, I discovered a world of insects I’d never seen before. I wanted to share both the photos and a scattering of the information I learned with a wider audience.